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Grades / Exam Percentages on kings’ reports

Exam Percentages (all reports)

The exam percentage is the score that your child has achieved in each of their individual assessments. This is shown next to the average (mean) percentage score for the subject.

Quintiles (all reports for Years 7, 8 and 9)

Within the school report, it tells you which quintile your child is in, based on the results from the assessment which was completed by the whole year group.  If they are in quintile 1, this means their mark was in the top 20% of marks for this assessment in this year group.  If they are in quintile 5, their mark was in the lowest 20% of marks for this assessment in this year group.

Predicted Grade (all reports for Years 10 and 11)

The predicted grade provides a guide to the most likely GCSE grade that your child will attain if he/she continues to work at the same level with the same commitment to their studies that they show at the moment. GCSE grades are from 9 – 1. OCR Level 1 or Level 2 qualifications are graded from L2D* (Level 2 Distinction *) to L1P ( Level 1 Pass). PE (core) grades are F = fail, P = Pass, M = Merit and D = Distinction.

Colour Coding (all reports for Years 10 and 11)

You can see from the report that your son/daughter’s Current Assessment Grade/Predicted Grade is highlighted in one of four colours:
Purple if they are above their target grade for that subject.
Green if they are on their target grade for that subject.
Amber if they are one grade under their target grade for that subject.
Red if they are two or more grades under their target grade for that subject.

Attitude to Learning

Exceptionally successful learners will attain or exceed their target expectations throughout their time in education. In order to achieve this, their attitude to their learning is exemplary:
– They are curious – exploring ideas and asking questions in order to further their own understanding, both within the classroom and at home.
– They actively work to develop their vocabulary through reading widely and using words taught in class.
-They welcome feedback, acting on the advice of teachers and want to continue to improve their work, even when it may be difficult.
– They behave in a calm and thoughtful manner, displaying courtesy and understanding towards other members of the school community, at all times.
– They revisit material as part of their home learning, checking for their own understanding and asking questions of teaching staff if they do not feel confident.
– They meet deadlines – both within the classroom for the completion of tasks and for homework.
– They share their ideas and inspire others with their own love of learning.

What do the comments on ‘attitude to learning’ mean for my child?

Always:  In this subject, your child exhibits all or nearly all of the characteristics of an exceptionally successful learner, all of the time.

Mostly: In this subject, your child exhibits some of the characteristics of an exceptionally successful learner within this subject, however, there are still things they could work on to ensure they meet or exceed their target expectations.

Sometimes: In this subject, your child has exhibited some to these characteristics on occasion, but they need to do this consistently, focusing on each of these areas as targets for improving their attitude to learning.

Rarely: In this subject, your child’s current attitude to learning is slowing down their ability to make progress.  In order to be a successful learner, they need to begin to work on these target areas. Unless this change happens, your child will struggle to meet their target expectations in this subject.

Information in the report – Frequently Asked Questions

Quintiles are the values that divide a list of numbers into five equal parts.

To decide the quintile value for each subject, we put the scores from the results of the assessment into an ordered list. This gives us the range of marks. For example, the lowest mark could be 6/ 50 and the highest mark could be 49/50. Our range of marks would then be from  6/ 50  – 49 /50 or from 12% – 98%.

We then ‘cut’ the range into five equal parts.  The quintiles are at the ‘cuts’.

 

Within the school report, it tells you which quintile your child is in, based on the results from the assessment which was completed by the whole year group.  If they are in quintile 1, this means their mark was in the top 20% of marks for this assessment in this year group.  If they are in quintile 5, their mark was in the lowest 20% of marks for this assessment in this year group.

No – the assessments completed in the assessment cycle are identical in all classes and are moderated within departments to ensure that marking is accurate and fair.

Each quintile range applies to roughly 75 pupils.  Therefore a child could be in the top quintile but may remain in Set 2.  This of course applies to each of the quintile ranges and sets.

In addition, setting also takes into consideration the sustained level and accuracy of work in class and for homework as well as the attitude to learning shown by a pupil – eg. How willing are they to learn from their mistakes, take on board feedback effectively and explore ideas independently.  These attributes are all taken into account, along with the summative assessment marks when deciding if a pupil’s setting is where they can make the best possible progress.

The quintile ‘cuts’ are done in response to the range of marks from this cohort of pupils for this assessment.  This will obviously change from year to year so the same mark as a previous year will not necessarily mean the same quintile.

The graphs will show you where your child’s result lies within their quintile for each subject.  In this way, you will be able to see how confident they are within the quintile, but it will also help to show you if your child has made progress from the last time they were assessed in this subject – even if they have remained in the same quintile.

Because pupils come to us from a variety of different primary schools, they arrive with prior Key Stage 2 results and additional information from their teachers. We use this information in the same way as we use the assessment results – putting them in order and then ‘cutting’ that range into 5 sections. This is the Key Stage 2 quintile information you find at the top of the report. This quintile is an indicator of where your child’s Key Stage 2 results place within their cohort (year group) of pupils at Kings’.

  • The Graphs have been designed to help you identify how well your child has performed in comparison to others in the year group.
  • Each Quintile has, approximately, the same number of pupils; breaking the year group into 5 equal groups.
  • The width of each Quintile is the percentage range. The wider the Quintile the bigger the difference in percentage points. For example, the top of Quintile 1 may be 100% and the top of Quintile 2 may be 85%. Therefore, the percentage range of Quintile 1 would be 15%.

  • These numbers show the % mark at the upper end of the range.  Looking at this mark and comparing it with your child’s mark will help you to see where your child’s mark comes within that quintile and how close they are to the next quintile.

 

  • We do not feel it adds any value to highlight the lowest percentage within a year group. We believe that it is more important that pupils and parents understand how many percentage points it would take to get to the next Quintile, rather than how close they may have been from the lowest.

 

  • We have tried to ensure that there are no discrepancies, however, where the % marks are very heavily clustered together, there may be some very small differences around the Quintile Zones. This means that a pupil’s result may show on their report as Quintile 2 but their percentage result sits right at the bottom of Quintile 1 using the graphs.

 

Evidence from across the country shows that if a pupil’s attendance score is at 96% or above, they are in the best possible position to meet or exceed their targets academically and to get the most out of all the co-curricular activities that school has to offer.

Any drop below a 96% attendance score causes serious concerns for the pupil’s capacity to meet or exceed their targets.